One Thoughtful Panini…

I’ve eaten a lot of paninis, so many that I like to consider myself a panini connoisseur.  On my blog, I share the ones that stand out- this one stood out.  I went to Ballaro in New York on an early Sunday afternoon, unaware that they were only serving their brunch menu and not their regular menu, which included a long list of paninis.  Fortunately for me, my waitress and I devised a plan where we could create an amazing panini despite their limited Sunday ingredients.

Lo and behold this thoughtfully created panini, a perfect example of why two minds are better than one:

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This panini consisted of the basic Italian ingredients: Parmesan, arugula, olive oil, and Bresaola.  My waitress, who was from Italy, explained to me how they make Bresaola in her country.  It is an air dried beef, that has been aged for two to three months until it becomes this rich purple color (see next picture).

Much to my surprise, this panini was thoughtfully created in yet one more way:

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Mid bite, I noticed that the Bresaola had been grilled on the panini separately before grilled with the sandwich (notice the grill marks).  Genius!

PANINI TIP: Depending on the type of ingredients, grill the meats and veggies in your sandwich separately before you grill them all together.

 

Enjoy,

Sani

Fancy Panini

Have you ever had a fancy panini?  When I mean fancy, I mean not knowing what half of the ingredients are. I had the best fancy panini at a very little place in New York City called Salumé.  Their panini menu was amazing, it was divided into sections according to the meat.  I chose from the Prosciutto Crudo list of panini called Parma Black Label.  

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Literally, the only ingredients that looked familiar from the Parma Black Label was the young lettuce and the lemon aioli.  I had zero clue what Bottarga and St. George Gin were.  Bottarga originated in Italy where they would press dried eggs of tuna or grey mullet.  It ages anywhere from a couple weeks to a 6 months, and you watch the color change until its a deep orange.  It’s also described as ‘pressed caviar’.  Eventually I realized that St. George Gin was simply a type of Gin incorporated into the sandwich. 

The presentation was beautiful, on a wooden chop block with a Parmesan crisp and some well seasoned vegetables. 

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Here’s a close up picture so you can see how all the elements were layered:

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(Bottarga is the orange part on the very bottom.)